Stations of the U.S. Cavalry prior to WWII

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rayarthart
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Does anyone have a list of where the U.S. Cavalry was stationed at prior to WWII? I know that after WWI The 1st Cavalry Division was stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas along the Texas/Mexican border until 1944. What is the Offical date that the United States abolished the Horse Cavalry?


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You might try Force Structure and Unit History Branch of the Center of Military History at, http://www.history.army.mil/inquire.html .
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rayarthart wrote: Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:16 pm What is the Offical date that the United States abolished the Horse Cavalry?
There's a variety of threads on this and that's a more difficult question to answer than it might seem as every time you think you've found the "last" in terms of date, you'll find something after it.

It might be best just to link that date on the termination of the cavalry branch which came with the National Security Act of 1947. At that point the cavalry officially concluded as an Army branch.
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rayarthart wrote: Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:16 pm Does anyone have a list of where the U.S. Cavalry was stationed at prior to WWII? I know that after WWI The 1st Cavalry Division was stationed at Ft. Bliss, Texas along the Texas/Mexican border until 1944. What is the Offical date that the United States abolished the Horse Cavalry?
I don't know where the cavalry was right before World War Two, although it's an interesting question. As noted, Ft. Bliss was one station. Ft. Myers was another. Cavalry had been at Ft. D. A. Russell between the wars but no longer was by 1941. The 4th Cavalry was at Ft. Meade, South Dakota. The 2nd Cavalry was at Ft. Riley right before WWII. The 6th was at Ft Oglethorpe.
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rayarthart
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Thanks I know that after the Puntitive Expedition from 1917 on the regular Cavalry from Ft. Bliss operated on the border.
Mike Miller
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This may help:

ARMY LINEAGE SERIES
ARMOR-CAVALRY
Part I:
Regular Army and Army Reserve
by
Mary Lee Stubbs
and
Stanley Russell Connor
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF MILITARY HISTORY
UNITED STATES ARMY
WASHINGTON, D.C., 1969
________________________________________
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 69-60002
First Printing
Page 71
This horse-mechanized principle had been applied to two cavalry regiments, the 4th and the 6th. In those units large vans were used for transporting horses to keep pace with the mechanical elements. The horses could be unloaded quickly and employed in mounted actions to supplement operations of the mechanized cavalry. With the 4th and 6th Cavalry already partially mechanized and the 1st and 13th Cavalry under the Armored Force, ten horse cavalry regiments remained. Of these, the 5th, 7th, 8th, and 12th were organic elements of the 1st Cavalry Division, and by late 1941 the 2d, 9th, 10th, and 14th were in the 2d Cavalry Division. Only the 3d and 11th Cavalry were nondivisional mounted regiments.

Cavalry Posts which may have had active units at the time:
Fort Ethan Allen Vermont
Fort Meade South Dakota
Fort Clark Texas
Fort Bliss Texas
Camp Crockett California
Presidio of Monterey California
Fort Huachuca Arizona
Fort Des Moines Iowa
Fort Oglethorpe Georgia
Fort Myer Virginia
Fort Riley Kansas
Fort Douglas Utah
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The end of Cavalry Branch from page 75-76:

Since the Armored Force had been created as a temporary measure for World War II, armor was not a permanent arm to which officers could be assigned. The officers retained their basic branch while serving with armored
75
(tank) units. To prevent the loss of identity of armored officers, the War Department began action in early 1947 to assign them to the cavalry. At the same time, announcement was made of expected eventual statutory approval of an armored cavalry arm to replace cavalry. Pending that action, all qualified armored (tank) officers were to be detailed in cavalry, unless they objected. Cavalry officers not qualified in and not desiring to serve with armor could be transferred to or detailed to other arms and services.
As late as August 1949, official publications listed armored cavalry, instead of cavalry, as a branch of the Army. Described as "an arm of mobility, armor protected firepower, and shock action," armored cavalry was to engage in all types of combat actions in co-ordination with other arms and services. Reconnaissance types of missions were usually to be performed by light armored cavalry units, which were to avoid sustained offensive or defensive combat.
Use of the term armored cavalry was a compromise between those who wanted the word armor in the new branch name and those who were as reluctant to discard the term cavalry as they had been to part with their horses. To others, especially those who had not served with horse cavalry, armor was a new medium, and that term best described the branch. On the other hand, proponents for the continued use of the term cavalry contended that armor, or whatever it might be called, still was the mounted branch- regardless of its mode of transportation- teaching the same principles of mobility, firepower, and shock action. The combination term, armored cavalry, was not popular with either group, but the matter was finally resolved, at least legally, when Congress, in its Army Organization Act of 1950, designated armor as the new branch name and further provided that it would be "a continuation of the cavalry."
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